Benjamin D. Rubin, M.D., M.S. - Orthopaedic Surgeon
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News Articles

Quadriceps exercise relieves pain in knee osteoarthritis
Source:
Medical Xpress

A quadriceps isometric contraction exercise method is effective for relieving pain in knee osteoarthritis (OA), according to a study published online May 25 in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

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Platelet-rich plasma injections may lead to improvements in tissue healing
Source:
Medical Xpress

Tiger Woods, Kobe Bryant and A-Rod have all used it, but does platelet-rich plasma therapy (PRP) really work for the every-day active person? According to a University of Alberta Glen Sather Sports Medicine Clinic pilot study on patients with chronically sore shoulders published in PLOS ONE, preliminary findings say yes.

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New pain relief technique for ACL knee surgery preserves muscle strength
Source:
Medical News Today

Anesthesiologists can significantly reduce loss of muscle strength in ACL knee surgery patients using a new pain management technique, a new study has found.

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Career length and performance decreased after ACL injury in professional hockey players
Source:
Healio

Although most professional hockey players are able to return to play after ACL injury, career length and performance may be significantly decreased compared with a control group, according to results.

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Lifelong physical activity increases bone density in men
Source:
Medical Xpress

Men have many reasons to add high-impact and resistance training to their exercise regimens; these reasons include building muscle and shedding fat. Now a University of Missouri researcher has determined another significant benefit to these activities: building bone mass. The study found that individuals who continuously participated in high-impact activities, such as jogging and tennis, during adolescence and young adulthood, had greater hip and lumbar spine bone mineral density than those who did not.

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Why is calcific tendinitis so painful?
Source:
Medical Xpress

Calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, typically characterized by calcium deposits on the rotator cuff, is an extremely painful condition that can severely impair movement and life quality. A new study appearing in today's issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, found a significant increase in blood vessel and pain receptor growth among patients with this condition.

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Tobacco use linked with more complications after ACL reconstruction
Source:
Healio

Researchers of this database study discovered significantly higher rates of infection, venous thromboembolism and subsequent reconstruction within 90 days following arthroscopic-assisted anterior ACL reconstruction among patients who used tobacco compared with non-tobacco users.

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Study: Are football players too obese?
Source:
Medical Xpress

In the world of American football, there is a stigma that players need to increase their overall body size to make an impact on the field. But, new research from a Grand Valley State University movement science professor and one of his students suggests that being bigger doesn't mean being better—or healthier.

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Promising outcomes seen with arthroscopic osseous Bankart repair
Source:
Healio

This 5-year to 8-year follow-up study showed arthroscopic osseous Bankart repair is efficacious for patients with greater than 15% loss of the inferior glenoid diameter and can provide normalized glenoid morphology as well as low rates of dislocation.

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Girls suffer more overuse injuries in teen sports
Source:
Medical News Today

A new study performed by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows that when it comes to overuse injuries in high school sports, girls are at a much higher risk than boys. Overuse injuries include stress fractures, tendonitis and joint pain, and occur when athletes are required to perform the same motion repeatedly.

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A hip and trunk training program for athletes reduces ACL injuries
Source:
Medical Xpress

With the help of the Hockeyroos UWA researchers have developed a hip and trunk training program that could reduce the high rates of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in all levels of sport.

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An Injury Curveball for Young Pitchers
Source:
Daily Rx

The love of America's pastime might lead many young players to play as often and as hard as they can, sometimes for multiple teams. However, that might increase these players' risk of getting hurt.

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Year-round baseball leads to more youth injuries, study says
Source:
Medical Xpress

Being able to play baseball year-round puts young pitchers in the southern United States at increased risk for an overuse injury in their throwing arm, a new study finds.

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One ACL Injury Might Mean More Down the Road
Source:
DailyRx

Injuries are a potential risk athletic kids face. Concussions may be getting a lot of press lately, but injuries to the knee may be just as important.

A new study found that young athletes who needed ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) surgery were likely to re-injure their knees over a 15-year period.

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Predictors of throwing velocity in youth and adolescent pitchers
Source:
Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

Background
Shoulder and elbow injuries are a common cause of pain, dysfunction, and inability to play in overhead throwers. Pitch velocity plays an integral part in the etiology of these injuries; however, the demographic and biomechanical correlates with throwing velocity remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that pitchers with higher velocity would have shared demographic and kinematic characteristics.

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Workout Supplements Could Be Causing Testicular Cancer
Source:
doximity

Researchers can’t explain why incidence of testicular cancer has risen from 3.7 cases per 100,000 men in 1975, up to 5.9 cases per 100,000 in 2011. In the United States, 8,500 men are diagnosed with the disease every year, and it is currently the most common form of cancer found in young men ages 15—35.

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Diving
Source:
Healthychildren

Competitive springboard and platform divers start training and competing at an early age. Many Olympic and world champions are 18 years of age and younger.

Diving is considered a collision sport because of the impact with the water on entry. A diver entering the water from the 10-meter platform is traveling almost 40 miles per hour. These forces are enough to break bones and dislocate joints. Divers are also at risk of injuries from hitting the board or platform as well as overuse injuries similar to gymnasts from frequent jumping, back arching, trunk flexion, and back twisting. Injuries can also occur from training on "dry land." This type of training usually includes weight lifting and the use of spotting belts, trampolines, and springboards.

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Recovery regression seen in athletes who return from concussions too quickly
Source:
Healio

High school athletes who returned to the field after being medically cleared within 60 days of a concussion experienced significant regression in their ability to walk and do simple mental tasks simultaneously, according to results from a University of Oregon study.

The study included 19 adolescents with concussion who returned to preinjury activity within 2 months following injury and 19 uninjured, matched controls. Researchers had participants complete symptom inventories, computerized cognitive testing, and single- and dual-task gait analyses at five time points: within 72 hours of injury and again at 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month and 2 months.

Changes in walking speed and/or balance were seen in 12 out of 19 athletes, according to a University of Oregon press release. Ten of the 12 had returned to activity in less than a month. Seven athletes, who performed similarly to uninjured control subjects, had returned to action more than 20 days after their injuries.

“We had seen this same type of curve in an earlier study of college athletes,” study author Li-Shan Chou, PhD, said in the press release. “We didn’t have any evidence linking it to a return to activity, but we did discuss that possibility, because we knew that they usually were permitted to return to practice 2 weeks after a concussion.”

The current standard for allowing most athletes to return to activity is based mostly on self-reports of symptoms and individual assessments of cognition or motor function, according to the release.

Reference:
Howell DR. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2014; doi:10.1249/MSS.0000000000000462

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Fatigue issues pose biggest threat to arms of young baseball pitchers
Source:
Healio

Young baseball pitchers can lessen the likelihood of injury by taking steps to ensure their pitching does not overly fatigue their arm, according to recently published data.

Researchers conducted a national survey of 754 pitchers between the ages of 9 and 18 years who had pitched in organized youth baseball leagues during the previous 12 months. Self-reported risk-prone pitching activities were identified, while any correlations between all self-reported pitching activities, shoulder and elbow problems, and injuries were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression.

Of the overall cohort, 43.4% reported pitching on consecutive days, 30.7% pitched on multiple teams with overlapping seasons and 19% pitched multiple games a day. These activities led to having an increased odds ratio (2.53, 1.85 and 1.89, respectively) for pitching-related arm pain. Approximately 70% of pitchers threw curveballs, an activity that made them 1.66 times more likely to experience arm pain while throwing, according to the researchers.

Individuals who often pitched with arm tiredness and arm pain also had greater odds (7.88 and 7.50, respectively) of sustaining a pitching-related injury.

Pitching for a travel baseball club, playing baseball exclusively or playing catcher had no significant correlation to arm problems, the researchers found.

Disclosure: Funding for this study was provided by the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine.

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Divergent trends seen in meniscal and cartilage injuries between primary and revision ACL repair
Source:
Healio

In a community-based sample, the prevalence of articular cartilage injury increased between primary and revision ACL repair, whereas the prevalence of meniscal injury decreased, according to recent study findings.

Researchers studied 261 patients who underwent both primary and revision ACL reconstruction (ACLR) between February 2005 and September 2011 via community-based registry. Patient data (sex, age, race and BMI), procedure characteristics and descriptive statistics (medians, interquartile ranges, frequencies and proportions) were the metrics used for evaluation.

Overall, 256 patients required revision ACLR due to instability, and the remaining five were due to infection.

Cartilage injuries nearly doubled (14.9% to 31.8%) from primary to revision ACLR, whereas meniscal tears decreased overall from 54.8% at primary ACLR to 43.7% at revision. This trend was also reflected in lateral meniscus tears (32.2% at primary, 18.4% at revision), though medial meniscus tears were observed to be the same (32.6%) at both primary and revision ACLR, according to the researchers.

A 70.8% prevalence of meniscus tear in revision was observed in patients who had meniscus fixation during primary ACLR.

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.

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Female athletes at highest risk for first-time noncontact ACL tear
Source:
Healio

Although multiple factors influence first-time noncontact ACL injuries, female athletes are most at risk to sustain them, according to recently published data.

Researchers reviewed first-time noncontact ACL injury data from 320,719 collegiate athletes and 873,057 high school athletes between fall 2008 and spring 2012. Athlete exposure was determined retrospectively using team-reported schedule and roster data. Effects of competition level, sport and sex on ACL injury risk were estimated by Poisson regression.

Athlete incidence rate was 0.150 per 1,000 person-days among collegiate athletes and 0.061 per 1,000 person-days among high school athletes. When adjusted for differences in sport and gender, the researchers found college athletes were significantly more likely to sustain a first-time noncontact ACL injury than high school athletes.

Overall injury incidence rate was 0.112 in female athletes and 0.063 for males. When adjusted for sport and level of play, females were more than two times more likely than males to have a first-time noncontact ACL injury.

Among all athletes, rugby and soccer players ran the highest risk of these ACL injuries (2.23 and 1.77 times more likely, respectively), according to the researchers.

Disclosure: This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01 AR050421) and the Department of Energy (SC00017).

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Identifying risk factors for ACL re-injury
Source:
Medical News Today

Re-tearing a repaired knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) happens all too frequently, however a recent study being presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting suggests that identification and patient education regarding modifiable risk factors may minimize the chance of a future ACL tear.

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Autografts may improve ACL reconstructions
Source:
Medical News Today

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstructions occur more than 200,000 times a year, but the type of material used to create a new ligament may determine how long you stay in the game, say researchers who presented their work at the Annual Meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine (AOSSM).

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Risk factors identified for little league shoulder
Source:
MedicalNewsToday

As cases of Little League Shoulder (LLS) occur more frequently, the need for additional information about the causes and outcomes of the condition has become clear. Researchers presenting at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting shared new data identifying associated risk factors, common treatment options and return to play.

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NFL players return to the game after stabilizing shoulder surgery
Source:
MedicalNewsToday

Shoulder instability is a common injury in football players but the rate of return to play has not been regularly determined following surgery. A new study, discussed at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting, details that return rates for NFL players is approximately 90 percent no matter what the stabilization procedure (open vs. arthroscopic).

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Anatomic features not tied to pain in rotator cuff tears
Source:
MedicalXpress

Anatomic features associated with the severity of atraumatic rotator cuff tears are not associated with pain level, according to a study published in the May 21 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Short term improvements only for shoulder revision repair surgery
Source:
MedicalNewsToday

Long-term outcomes of revision arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery is not as successful as in a first-time surgery, according to researchers from the Orthopaedic Research Institute in Sydney, Australia, who presented their work at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty Day.

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Rotator Cuff Repair and Immobilization
Source:
MethodistOrthopedics

Shoulder rotator cuff repair aims to suture torn rotator cuff tendons and provide them with the optimal environment to heal and minimize chance of retear. Overall retear rates have decreased over the years, but are still a major concern. Better suture techniques have been thoroughly investigated but there is less attention paid to the rehabilitation protocol. Currently the gold standard for rehabilitation after surgery is to wear an abduction brace and begin physical therapy for passive range of motion within the first few weeks. As surgical techniques have evolved from open surgery to arthroscopic surgery, there are questions as to whether this rehabilitation protocol is ideal. Animal studies have shown that longer periods of immobilization are beneficial to healing after rotator cuff repair.

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Baseball pitchers, volleyball spikers have something in common: Similar shoulder, elbow injuries
Source:
ScienceDaily

Baseball and volleyball players share the similar arm injuries due to overuse of their shoulders and elbows. In both circumstances, the shoulder muscles generate and transmit an incredible amount of energy and serve as the transition point where built up energy is transferred from the rest of the body down the arm. After too many pitches or serves, these shoulder muscles get overworked and tend to cause the shoulder to tighten up.

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ACL injury risk reduced in young athletes by universal neuromuscular training
Source:
Medical News Today

The ACL is a critical ligament that stabilizes the knee joint. An ACL injury, one of the most common sports injuries, often requires surgery and a lengthy period of rehabilitation before an athlete can return to sport and other activities. Recent research has found that screening tools, such as "hop" or isokinetic (computer/video) tests to identify neuromuscular deficits, as well as neuromuscular training programs, may reduce ACL injuries.

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Study finds most college football players return to play after ACL repair
Source:
Healio

High-level college football players frequently return to the field after ACL reconstruction, according to results of a study of Division 1 NCAA football players presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Specialty Day.

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Speaker: Sleep disturbances improve over time after rotator cuff repair
Source:
Healio

Patients show improvements in their sleep disturbance following rotator cuff surgery, according to data presented here at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

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Reducing the risk of falls by motivating older people to do preventative exercise
Source:
Medical News Today

Simple strength and balance training can effectively help to prevent falls, but Bournemouth University research shows only a minority of older people will carry out these exercises.

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How to Prevent Winter Sports Injuries
Source:
US News

Get out and enjoy winter but take steps to protect yourself from common ski- and snowboard-related injuries such as sprains, strains, dislocations and fractures, an orthopedist says.

"No matter your skill level, everyone is susceptible to injury on the slopes," said Dr. Allston Stubbs, an associate professor of orthopedics at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, said in a center news release. "Most of these injuries happen at the end of the day, so you may want to think twice before going for 'one last run,' especially when you're tired."

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Ready to Get in Shape? Ease Into Exercise, Experts Say
Source:
US News

Watching the Winter Olympics in Sochi may inspire some to get off the couch and begin working out or playing sports, but it's important to ease into these activities, an expert suggests.

"Just watching these events can serve as a tremendous inspiration to shape up, change or start a physical activity or sports regimen," Jim Thornton, president of the National Athletic Trainers' Association, said in a news release from the group.

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Brain-training game improves vision and success of baseball players
Source:
Medical News Today

In baseball, vision can play a key role in a player's success. If they have trouble seeing the ball, chances are they could be out after three strikes. But new research from the University of California, Riverside, suggests that a brain-training video game could help to improve the vision of baseball players and, in turn, help them win more games.

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Houston Methodist sports medicine experts discuss important facts about mouthguards
Source:
News Medical

After every play, we all see the athletes adjusting their mouthguards, but what do they actually protect? Houston Methodist sports medicine experts discuss important facts about mouthguards.

Can wearing a mouthguard prevent a concussion?

"No, mouthguards cannot prevent a concussion," said Dr. Vijay Jotwani, a sports medicine-focused primary care physician with Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine. "Mouthguards do not affect the movement of the brain within the skull and cerebrospinal fluid, so they are ineffective at reducing the forces on the brain that cause concussions."

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82% of college football players return to field after ACL surgery, shows study
Source:
News Medical

High-level college football players frequently return to the field after an ACL reconstruction, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty Day. The study added to earlier research by exploring specific factors that affected return to play, including player standing on rosters and year in school.

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Study finds shoulder replacement eases pain, improves motion in rheumatoid arthritis
Source:
MedicalNewsToday

Shoulder arthritis is a common problem for rheumatoid arthritis patients: pain and difficulty moving their arms can grow so severe that daily tasks and sleep become difficult. If medication and physical therapy aren't enough, shoulder replacement surgery is a common next step.

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Early motion shows results comparable to immobilization after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair
Source:
Healio

In a 30-month follow-up of young patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, researchers found no significant differences in shoulder function between those who had early passive range of motion and patients who were immobilized.

“There is no apparent advantage or disadvantage of early passive range of motion compared with immobilization with regard to healing or functional outcome,” Jay D. Keener, MD, and colleagues from Washington University wrote in their abstract.

The investigators studied 124 patients younger than 65 years who underwent arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears and were randomized to either an early range of motion rehabilitation process or to an immobilization group that had range of motion delayed for 6 weeks. The investigators evaluated the patients using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Simple Shoulder Test, relative Constant score and strength measurements. There were 114 patients available for final follow-up.

At 3 months postoperatively, the immobilization group had significantly better mean active range of motion into elevation and external rotation compared with the early motion cohort. “After 3 months, there were no significant differences in VAS pain score, active range-of-motion values, shoulder strength measures, or any of the functional scales between the groups at the time of the 6-month, 12-month, or final follow-up evaluation,” wrote Keener and colleagues wrote in their study.

Although the investigators’ research did not study patient satisfaction, “Immobilization did not appear to lead to greater risks of shoulder stiffness,” they wrote. There was also no difference in terms of tendon healing between groups. “Either early passive motion or a period of early immobilization is equally safe and effective after surgical rotator cuff repair in this cohort,” the researchers wrote.

Disclosure: One or more of the authors received payments or services, either directly or indirectly (i.e., via his or her institution), from a third party in support of an aspect of this work. In addition, one or more of the authors, or his or her institution, has had a financial relationship, in the 36 months prior to submission of this work, with an entity in the biomedical arena that could be perceived to influence or have the potential to influence what is written in this work. No author has had any other relationships, or has engaged in any other activities, that could be perceived to influence or have the potential to influence what is written in this work.

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Study highlights importance of Bankart lesion size for arthroscopic repair techniques
Source:
Healio

One of the first studies to analyze the outcomes of arthroscopic repair according to lesion size suggests small-sized bony Bankart lesions should be treated with a different procedure than lesions measuring 12.5% to 25% of the inferior glenoid width. “In small Bankart lesions, restoration of capsulolabral soft tissue tension alone may be enough,” whereas in medium lesions, the osseous architecture of the glenoid should be reconstructed for more functional improvement and less pain,” Young-Kyu Kim, MD, and colleagues wrote in their study.

The researchers conducted a minimum 24-month follow-up of 34 patients with small- and medium-sized lesions that were measured by CT and treated arthroscopically. Surgeons performed capsulolabral repair using suture anchors without excision of the bony fragment for 16 small-sized lesions (<12.5% of the inferior glenoid width) and anatomic reduction and fixation using suture anchors for 18 medium-sized lesions (12.5% to 25% of the inferior glenoid width).

Overall, the investigators found the Visual Analog Scale score improved from 1.7 preoperatively to 0.5 at final follow-up (24 months). The mean modified Rowe score also improved from 59 to 91. In the medium-sized lesion group, the mean postoperative Rowe scores increased from 60 to 95 in cases of anatomic reduction compared with an increase from 56 to 76 in cases of nonanatomic reduction. – by Christian Ingram Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.

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Risk Factors for Complications After Knee Replacement
Source:
dailyRx

While knee replacement surgery can help to improve mobility, there can be complications connected to this procedure. And some patients may be at a higher risk for experiencing these complications than others. A recent study found that being older, having diabetes and being obese were significant risk factors for death or experiencing complications like wound infections in the 30 days after knee replacement surgery.

The authors of this study noted that patients and physicians should be mindful of any new symptoms or pain that occurs after having knee replacement surgery.

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Stem Cell Therapy Following Meniscus Knee Surgery May Reduce Pain, Restore Meniscus
Source:
ScienceDaily

A single stem cell injection following meniscus knee surgery may provide pain relief and aid in meniscus regrowth, according to a novel study appearing in the January issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS).

In the first-of-its-kind study, "Adult Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) Delivered via Intra-Articular Injection to the Knee, Following Partial Medial Meniscectomy," most patients who received a single injection of adult stem cells following the surgical removal of all or part of a torn meniscus, reported a significant reduction in pain.

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A Little Exercise Goes a Long Way to Prevent Disease in Children
Source:
ScienceDaily

Studies conducted by the Appalachian State University Human Performance Laboratory at the NC Research Campus in Kannapolis, N.C., show that when children increase their level of physical activity, they experience positive health benefits quickly. Benefits include less body fat, increased muscular strength and reduced risk factors for major diseases like diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other metabolic and lifestyle-related disorders.

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Overuse Injuries, Burnout in Youth Sports Can Have Long-Term Effects
Source:
ScienceDaily

As an emphasis on competitive success in youth sports has led to intense training, frequent competition and early single sport specialization, overuse injuries and burnout have become common. Given these concerns, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) has released a new clinical report that provides guidance to physicians and healthcare professionals who provide care for young athletes.

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Improper way of working out may do more harm than good
Source:
News Medical

With the coming of the new year, many people will vow to get in shape after overindulging during the holidays. However, not knowing the proper way to work out might do more harm than good.

Nearly 500,000 workout-related injuries occur each year. One reason is people want to do too much too fast and overuse their muscles. These injuries occur gradually and are often hard to diagnose in the bones, tendons and joints. Another reason is poor technique during weight and other training.

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When Winter Fun Isn't So Fun
Source:
US News (Health)

Winter sports and snowy day activities provide lots of exercise and fun, but there's also the risk of injury, an expert warns.

"More than 700,000 injuries are reported each year in the United States due to sledding. More than 30 percent are head injuries, caused by collisions," Dr. Daryl O'Connor, an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in sports medicine at Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, part of the Loyola University Health System, said in a Loyola news release.

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Youth football concussions occurred mostly during games, not practice
Source:
Healio

Children playing tackle football are more likely to sustain a concussion during games and not practice, according to recent study results published in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Additional oblique MRI improved diagnosis of ACL tears
Source:
Healio

The accuracy of diagnosing an ACL tear and efficacy in detecting ACL remnant tissue was improved with the additional use of oblique MRI, according to recently published study.

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Relief for Rotator Cuff Tears 
Source:
Ivanhoe.com

While athletes suffer from traumatic forms of the injury, for many others age is to blame for torn rotator cuffs. It's believed millions of Americans over 60 suffer from one. Every year 250 thousand people go under the knife for relief, but now there's a surgery-free alternative you can do for free!

Just taking plates out of the cupboard was excruciating for Kay Subhawong.

She has a torn rotator cuff. The small muscles that hold the shoulder joint together have ripped apart.

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Better posture can help ease shoulder pain from impingement
Source:
UT Sandiego

Shoulder pain from impingement occurs frequently as the rotator cuff tendons and sometimes a bursal sac get pinched under the roof of the shoulder blade or the acromion. People with a downward slope of the acromion, or who have developed bone spurs from arthritis in the adjacent acromioclavicular (AC) joint, are more susceptible to developing such impingement.

The mechanism causing this disorder may be a gradual or sudden elevation of the ball of the shoulder joint, squishing the described soft tissues against the acromion roof. The rotator cuff muscles are responsible for keeping the ball of the shoulder joint down and away from the roof as we elevate the arm.

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Physical therapy or surgery for knee pain
Source:
The Augusta Chronicle

Knee pain affects millions of Americans, particularly as they get older. The most common cause of knee pain is osteoarthritis, a joint disease where the cartilage between bones is lost.
Unfortunately, it is difficult for doctors to determine if a patient's knee pain is from osteoarthritis or from the meniscal tear. Both conditions are common and both have similar symptoms of pain, knee popping and knee locking.

Some doctors will recommend surgery to fix the meniscal tear while others will recommend a more conservative approach with physical therapy.

A new article in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that an initial conservative approach with physical therapy may be a better option.

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START team examines surgery-free treatment for people with knee osteoarthritis
Source:
News-Medical.Net

At 94 years old, he suffers from knee osteoarthritis, a debilitating yet common ailment for older Americans that makes physical activity both difficult and painful.

Tise is nevertheless doing leg presses, lifting weights and participating in cardio exercises three times a week at Wake Forest University's Clinical Research Center.

"The exercise seems to be working," he says. "I feel better, move better, and it has even helped my golf game. I now play once a week, weather permitting. I'm driving the ball further and straighter and enjoying it more."

Tise is one of 372 individuals over the age of 55 that will participate in Wake Forest's Strength Training for Arthritis Trial or START, a first-of-a-kind, 5-year study to test the benefits of high intensity strength training, low intensity strength training, and healthy living on older adults with knee OA.

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Physical activity really does enhance cognition
Source:
Medical News Today

Exercise doesn't only strengthen your heart and muscles - it also beefs up your brain. Dozens of studies now show that aerobic exercise can increase the size of critical brain structures and improve cognition in children and older adults.

University of Illinois psychology professor Art Kramer, a nationally recognized expert on the role of physical fitness on cognition, discussed these brain-changing outcomes at a session of the 2013 meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston. Kramer is the director of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the U. of I.

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Why so idle with knee OA?
Source:
DailyRx.com

Being obese or overweight can make osteoarthritis worse. Staying physically active is one of the best ways to avoid putting on extra pounds. However, many osteoarthritis patients remain inactive.

These findings suggest that there may be a serious need to improve physical activity among patients with knee osteoarthritis. According to the authors, increasing physical activity among these patients will likely involve weight management, healthy diet and improving pain and disability.

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Female Athletes Three Times More Likely to Suffer from Anterior Cruciate Ligament Ruptures
Source:
Science Daily

Female athletes are three times more likely to suffer from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures, one of the most common knee injuries, compared to male athletes. The ACL is one of the four main ligaments within the knee that connect the femur (upper leg bone) to the tibia (lower leg bone). Recent research highlights the unique anatomical differences in the female knee that may contribute to higher injury rates, and should be taken into consideration during reconstructive surgery and sports training, according to a review article in the January 2013 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS).

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Adolescent athletes show asymmetric function in knee after ACL reconstruction
Source:
Healio.com

Adolescent athletes who underwent ACL reconstruction showed a decreased vertical ground force in their operated limb after surgery, which researchers cited as potential factor for reinjury when returning to sport, according to this study.

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Sports training and ACL reconstruction should focus on unique characteristics of the female knee
Source:
Medical News Today

Female athletes are three times more likely to suffer from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)ruptures, one of the most common knee injuries, compared to male athletes. The ACL is one of the four main ligaments within the knee that connect the femur (upper leg bone) to the tibia (lower leg bone). Recent research highlights the unique anatomical differences in the female knee that may contribute to higher injury rates, and should be taken into consideration during reconstructive surgery and sports training, according to a review article in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS).

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Shoulder complaint linked to diabetes diagnosis
Source:
News Medical

Study findings confirm suspicions that patients with diabetes have an increased risk for adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (ACS).

Using insurance claims data for 96% of the Taiwanese population between 2000 and 2003, the researchers compared the incidence of ACS in 78,827 patients with at least ambulatory visits for diabetes and 236,481 age- and gender-matched individuals without diabetes.

After a median of 31.87 months of follow-up, 1.20% of diabetes patients and 0.95% of controls were diagnosed with ACS, at rates of 4.92 and 3.67 cases per 1000 person-years, respectively, say Shin-Liang Pan (National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei) and co-workers.

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Association between lack of sleep and teen sports injuries
Source:
MedicalNewsToday

Hours of sleep per night were significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of injury, according to the study results. In addition, the higher the grade levels of the athlete, the greater the likelihood of injury - 2.3 times greater for each additional grade in school. Gender, weeks of participating in sports per year, hours of participation per week, number of sports, strength training, private coaching and subjective assessments of "having fun in sports" were not significantly associated with injury.

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Recurring Shoulder Instability Injuries Likely Among Young Athletes Playing Contact Sports
Source:
Science Daily

Summer is a peak season for many sports and with that comes sport-related injuries. Among those injuries is shoulder joint dislocation. According to a literature review in the August 2012 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, most incidents of shoulder joint instability are the result of traumatic contact injuries like force or falling on an outstretched arm; a direct blow to the shoulder area; forceful throwing, lifting or hitting; or contact with another player.

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Sports-related foot and ankle injuries on the rise
Source:
Virtual medical center.com

Sports-related injuries are part of the game, and as athletes are becoming stronger, faster, and better conditioned, higher-energy injuries are becoming common. Foot and ankle injuries are especially concerning because they are increasing in number and severity and are often misunderstood.

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Thera-Band Can Foam Rolling Increase Flexibility?
Source:
Hygenicblog

Many studies have shown that stretching is effective at increasing flexibility and range of motion (ROM); unfortunately, static stretching is also associated with immediate declines in performance. For that reason, stretching before athletic events has been discouraged in recent years.

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Arthroscopic surgery for torn shoulder muscles in elderly patients can reduce pain
Source:
News Medical

Repairing torn shoulder muscles in elderly patients is often discouraged because of fears of complications. But a new study conducted at Rush University Medical Center has shown that minimally invasive, or arthroscopic, surgery can significantly improve pain and function.

The study has just been published online in Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery and will appear in the October issue.

"In people over the age of 70, pain is the main issue, and pain relief is a fairly reliable outcome after surgery," said orthopedic surgeon Dr. Nikhil Verma, who led the study. "Patients do not require that their shoulder function be fully restored. They just want the pain to be gone." Verma is assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at Rush.

With that requirement, Verma said, "age is not a contraindication" for the surgery.

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Similarities in strength, outcomes for younger patients treated with tenotomy or tenodesis
Source:
Healio

Despite increased demands on biceps function, there are no significant differences in functional and outcome measurements in younger patients who had biceps tenotomy or tenodesis for the treatment of shoulder pain, according to a study presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sport Medicine Annual Meeting, here.

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Common shoulder injury treated non-surgically may increase chances of return-to-play
Source:
MedicalNewsToday

Surgically repairing a painful shoulder injury in baseball players known as a SLAP tear (superior labral) varies widely and often doesn't allow for return to play at the same level as before the injury. However, researchers presenting their findings at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland suggest that nonsurgical treatment may be more beneficial.

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Rehabilitation Following Rotator Cuff Surgery Requires Change
Source:
MedicalNewsToday

A new Hospital for Special Surgery study suggests that the current rehabilitation used for patients undergoing tendon-bone repairs such as rotator cuff repair may be partially to blame for the high rates of failed healing after surgery. Experiments in a rat model of this injury suggest that immobilizing the limb for four to six weeks after surgery, rather than quickly starting physical therapy, improves healing.

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Knee ligament injuries may be more common in men: study
Source:
Reuters

Men have a greater number of knee ligament injuries than women, despite research suggesting that women's knees are more prone to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears and surgeries to fix them, according to a Swedish study.

The report, published in the American Journal of Sports medicine, counted the injuries across the entire Swedish population, not just among players of particular sports or in certain regions.

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Regular exercise may increase pain tolerance
Source: MedicalNewsToday

Stories of athletes bravely "playing through the pain" are relatively common and support the widespread belief that they experience pain differently than non-athletes. Yet, the scientific data on pain perception in athletes has been inconsistent, and sometimes contradictory. Investigators from the University of Heidelberg have conducted a meta-analysis of available research and find that in fact, athletes can indeed tolerate a higher le